Procedures

The following pages contain information regarding commonly performed spine procedures for the neck and low back. The written contents are coupled with educational videos which are an artistic rendition of the actual procedures. Please feel free to explore the content and write to us with your comments and questions.

Disc Replacement Surgery

In a select few individuals, disc replacement surgery may be indicated. This is a relatively new technology whereby the damaged disc is replaced by a prosthetic motion device. The potential advantages include preservation of motion at the disc level and protection of the neighboring levels from accelerated wear and tear.

Disc Replacement Surgery Treats the Following Conditions:

Disc Rupture                        Pinched Nerve                    Back Pain              Radiculopathy                    Neck Pain

How long is the surgery?

Cervical disc replacement takes about three hours similar to one level lumbar disc replacement surgery.

How long is the hospital stay?

One level cervical disc replacement patients are released after overnight observation. Lumbar disc replacement requires two to three nights of hospital stay.

Do I need Anesthesia?

General anesthesia and muscle relaxation are needed for a comfortable experience.

Recovery Time

An initial two weeks of rest and relaxation is needed to ensure proper healing and adequate pain relief. By the third week after surgery, a course of physical therapy and a stretch exercise regimen are prescribed. Most people are able to resume their normal activities 4 weeks after the surgery.

Lumbar Herniated Disc Surgery

For individuals who are not able to obtain appropriate relief with physical therapy and pain management, and for those who experience muscle weakness and bladder irritability, Lumbar herniated disc surgery can provide great relief of pain and help with restoring the muscle strength. The pressure from the herniated disc interferes with function of the nerve. Through a small working channel, muscles over the spine are gently retracted. A small opening in the bone (Laminotomy) provides access to the disc. Once the herniated portion of the disc is removed, the nerve can start to recover.

Lumbar Herniated Disc Surgery Treats the Following Conditions:

Disc Rupture      Pinched Nerve  Back Pain              Radiculopathy  Spine Stenosis  Arthritis of Spine

How long is the surgery?

One level microlumbar discectomy is performed just under an hour. Removal of herniated disc fragments in the neck take 45 minutes to one hour per level.

How long is the hospital stay?

For lumbar disc herniations, patients are released home after a six to eight hour recovery.

Do I need Anesthesia?

General anesthesia and muscle relaxation are needed for a comfortable experience.

Recovery Time

An initial two weeks of rest and relaxation is needed to ensure proper healing and adequate pain relief. By the third week after surgery, a regimen of physical therapy and stretch exercise are prescribed. Most people are able to resume their normal activities by 4 weeks after the surgery.

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Surgery

In cases of nerve pain and entrapment caused by bone spurs, spinal decompression surgery can be very effective. Through a small working channel, the muscles of the back are gently retracted. A laminatomy or a small window in the bone overlying the nerves in the spine, the passageway of the nerve can be visualized. Bone outgrowths or arthritis of the joints in the back of the spine can produce impingement or narrowing of these passageways. Spinal decompression surgery is designed to re-open and remove the bone spurs from the nerve passage ways and free the nerve.

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Surgery Treats the Following Conditions:

Disc Rupture      Pinched Nerve  Back Pain              Spine Stenosis  Arthritis of Spine

How long is the surgery?

One level cervical or lumbar spinal stenosis surgery is performed just under an hour.

How long is the hospital stay?

For lumbar surgeries, patients are released home after a six to eight hour recovery. Most cervical procedures require overnight stay.

Do I need Anesthesia?

General anesthesia and muscle relaxation are needed for a comfortable experience.

Recovery Time

An initial two weeks of rest and relaxation is needed to ensure proper healing and adequate pain relief. By the third week after surgery, a course of physical therapy and stretch exercise regimen are prescribed. Most people are able to resume their normal activities by 4 weeks after the surgery.

Minimally Invasive Neck Surgery

Minimally invasive surgery is used by an experienced surgeon to minimize damage to the surrounding tissue, on the way to the spine. In minimally invasive neck surgery, special attention is given to preservation of the normal muscle and tendon attachments. Muscles are not cut; instead the surgery is performed by creating a tunnel, gently pushing the muscles aside. As soon as the surgery is completed, muscles return to their normal position.

Minimally Invasive Neck Surgery Treats the Following Conditions:

Bone Spurs          Bulging disc         Herniated disc  Pinched nerve   Spine stenosis  Arthritis of the neck

How long is the surgery?

An experienced team of nurses and anesthesiologists at one of our surgical facilities work together with Dr. Mobin. Front procedures for removal of herniated disc, or back approaches for shaving bone spurs and removing spine arthritis take one and one-half hour for routine procedures.

How long is the hospital stay?

Most patients are sent home after 6 hours of recovery at the facility. Front procedures for removal of disc and spacer placement require an overnight stay.

Do I need Anesthesia?

For the most comfortable experience, general anesthesia and being completely asleep through the procedure is recommended. An experienced group of anesthesiologists at our facilities administer and monitor the comfort and relaxation level.

Recovery Time

The minimally invasive procedures decrease the bleeding, tissue trauma and post-operative pain level. After the initial two weeks of recovery, patients return to work is generally around the third or fourth week after surgery.

Minimally Invasive Lumbar Fusion

Compared to the traditional surgery, minimally invasive lumbar fusion is designed to preserve the important muscles that cover the spine. Through small working channels, muscle fibers are gently spread and at the end of the surgery, they resume their normal position and attachment to the spine.

Minimally Invasive Lumbar Fusion Treats the Following Conditions:

Collapsed Disc  Recurrent Disc Rupture                  Back Pain   Pinched Nerve  Spine Stenosis  Arthritis of the neck

How long is the surgery?

For the neck fusions, the procedure takes about an hour for one level surgery. 30 minutes is added for additional levels. One level back surgery takes on the order of two hours . In case of muti-level surgery, an additional hour is needed per level.

How long is the hospital stay?

One or two nights of hospital stay may be necessary for adequate pain relief.

Do I need Anesthesia?

General anesthesia and muscle relaxation are needed for a comfortable experience.

 

Recovery Time

An initial two weeks of rest and relaxation is needed to ensure proper healing and adequate pain relief. By the third week after surgery, a course of physical therapy and stretch exercise regimen are prescribed. Most people are able to resume their normal activities by 6 weeks after the surgery. It is a bit quicker to recover from the neck fusion.

Minimally Invasive Cervical Decompression Surgery

Individuals with intractable neck pain and/or arm pain may be suffering from ruptured or herniated disc. In the neck, discs material can exert pressure on the nearby delicate nerves and spinal cord. The initial symptom, in most instances, is pain in either neck or the arm. Through the advances in spine surgery, safe and effective methods are available to relieve the nerve pain and restore function to the affected area in the cervical spine. The approach to the spine can be performed from the front or back of the neck.  Dr. Mobin places emphasis on the least invasive technique with the highest chance of success in relieving pain and disability.

Anterior (front) approaches are designed to remove either the entire disc or the herniated portion of the disc. Minimally invasive techniques allow our surgeon to carry out the surgery as an outpatient procedure. During the surgery, a small one to one and half inch incision is carried down to the level of the disc. An operating microscope allows for ample light and magnification. The procedure varies minimal risk of bleeding and meticulous surgical technique provide for rapid recovery and excellent cosmetic outcome.

Posterior (back) procedures are reserved for disc herniations which are accessible to a lateral approach, and for procedures requiring relieving pressures from multiple levels in the neck. Central and lateral (nerve) decompressions are possible through this approach.

Minimally Invasive Cervical Decompression Surgery Treats the Following Conditions:

Bone Spurs          Bulging disc         Herniated disc  Pinched nerve   Spine stenosis  Arthritis of the Back

How long is the surgery?

There will be an experienced team of nurses and anesthesiologists working together with Dr. Mobin. Front procedures for removal of herniated disc, or back approaches for shaving bone spurs and removing spine arthritis take one and one-half hour to two and one-half hours for routine procedures.

How long is the hospital stay?

Most patients are sent home after an overnight stay, including front procedures for removal of disc and spacer placement.

Do I need Anesthesia?

For the most comfortable experience, general anesthesia or being completely sleep through the procedure is recommended. An experienced group of anesthesiologists at our facilities administer and monitor the comfort and relaxation level.

Recovery Time

The minimally invasive procedures decrease the bleeding, tissue trauma and post-operative pain level. After the initial two weeks of recovery, physical therapy commences around the third week. Return to work is generally around the fourth or fifth week after surgery.

Minimally Invasive Back Surgery

There are large and strong muscles overlying the lower back. In traditional surgery, a muscle stripping approach is used to gain access to the spine. In minimally invasive back surgery, particular attention is given to save the normal muscle and tendon attachments. A tubular device or minimally invasive retractors provide the working channel by spreading the muscle fibers. At the completion of the surgery, the working channel is removed and the muscle and tendons resume their normal position.

Minimally Invasive Back Surgery Treats the Following Conditions:

Bone spurs  Bulging disc  Herniated disc  Pinched nerve  Spine stenosis  Arthritis of the neck

How long is the surgery?

For removal of the herniated disc and shaving bone spurs, the procedure is about one hour. For procedures involving more than one level, 30 minutes is needed for each additional level.

How long is the hospital stay?

After 6 hours of stay in recovery room you are discharged home. In procedures dealing with more than two levels, discharge home is after an overnight stay.

Do I need Anesthesia?

To obtain appropriate relaxation of the muscles, general anesthesia is used. This provides for the most pain free and relaxed experience.

Recovery Time

After going home, a two week rest and relaxation period is recommended. Most people are able to return to normal level of activity after 4 weeks. In cases of muscle weakness and deconditioning, a customized course of physical therapy will be prescribed.

eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF)

The XLIF (eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion) is an approach to spinal fusion in which the surgeon accesses the intervertebral disc space and fuses the lumbar spine (low back) using a surgical approach from the side (lateral) rather than from the front (anterior) or the back (posterior). The XLIF is a type of interbody fusion, which is a category of fusion in which the disc in the front of the spine is removed and replaced with an implant to set up the condition for the two vertebrae to fuse together through the disc space.

It is a minimally invasive type of spine surgery designed to accomplish a spinal fusion with several advantages including:

•                Minimal tissue damage

•                Minimal blood loss

•                Small incisions and scars

•                Minimal post-operative discomfort

•                Relatively quick recovery time and return to normal function.

Because of the above factors, it is one of a number of options for spinal fusion that are relatively minimally invasive.

eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF) Treats the Following Conditions:

Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease    Spondylolisthesis    Scoliosis   Disc Herniations  Lumbar Stenosis

How long is the surgery?

The length of the surgery is determined by the number of levels involved and complexity of the case. In general, each level general takes 2 hours to complete.

How long is the hospital stay?

For a one-level approach, in healthy individuals, an overnight stay followed by two weeks for the initial healing for the incision.  The incision is closed with absorbable sutures.

Do I need Anesthesia?

General Anesthesia and muscle relaxation are needed for a comfortable experience.

Recovery Time

An initial 2 weeks of rest and relaxation is needed to ensure proper healing and adequate pain relief.  By the third week after surgery, a regimen of physical therapy and stretch exercises are prescribed.  Most people are able to resume their normal activities by four to six weeks after the surgery.  It is common to experience anterior (front of) thigh pain or discomfort for three to six weeks.

Questions? (310) 829-5888
Make Appointment